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More Fans Find Best Seats at Home

AP

At game time, the temperature tumbled to 13 degrees below zero, with a minus-40 wind chill. Referee Norm Schachter's whistle froze to his lips. And the temperature kept dropping, but the fans staunchly remained, hunkered down in Lambeau Field, on New Year's Eve, 1967, for the coldest game in NFL history, a championship showdown forever famous as the Ice Bowl. Fans wore their clothing in layers, with, of course, warmers and ski masks and parkas; crowding together and clinging, many of them, to each other, they braved the glacial temperatures and remained to the dramatic end, a sellout crowd of 50,861.

If that title game between the Cowboys and Packers were played today under the same arctic conditions, how many fans do you think would be at Lambeau and how many would...

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